Paula Harrison The Darkest Dream Guest Post

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Robyn Silver: The Darkest Dream

 

I’m delighted to have Paula Harrison stopping by the blog today! Paula is here in celebration of the release of her new book Robyn Silver: The Darkest Dream. This is the second story in a wonderful adventure series and you can follow this link to read my review from earlier in the week.

Paula is sharing a guest post today that will give lucky readers some extra insight into her latest book.

 

Five random things you didn’t know about Robyn Silver: The Darkest Dream

  1. Robyn was born when the clock struck midnight which is why she can see monsters that other people can’t see. Luckily she meets two other people who were also born at midnight. Being the only one to see monsters would be pretty terrifying!
  2. The most ridiculous monster in the book is the mimicus which looks like an enormous pale jelly with eyes that can spring out on stalks from any part of its body. The mimicus can also copy people’s voices which is how it got its name.
  3. Weapons made from silver are the most effective against the monsters. But knowledge is also a powerful weapon in this story. Robyn, Nora and Aiden need to discover the truth about what’s terrorising their town and for this they have to raid an enemy’s library.
  4. Robyn has four brothers and sisters. Her sister Sammie, who is fourteen, is the person who annoys her most in the whole world.
  5. Grimdean House is where Robyn and her friends do their training. There is a Mortal Clock on the side of the tower which contains the power to awaken new monster hunters… when the clock strikes midnight

Paula Harrison

Paula Harrison is the best-selling children’s author of The Rescue Princesses series. Her books have sold over one million copies worldwide. Paula wanted to be a writer from a young age but spent many happy years as a primary school teacher first.

 

Thanks so much to Paula for visiting today and to Olivia at Scholastic for sending me this lovely book.


The Robyn Silver Series by Paula Harrison

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This Friday I’m lucky enough to have Paula Harrison stopping by with an exclusive guest post for fans of the Robyn Silver series. For those of you who don’t know the books already, I’ve reviewed them below and added some really brilliant links to resources to use in class. Enjoy!

Robyn Silver: The Midnight Chimes

Until last year, Robyn Silver was an ordinary ten year old girl living in an ordinary town doing ordinary everyday things. The middle child of five, Robyn was used to being a little overlooked and the greatest danger in her life was missing out on the last slice of pizza at the dinner table.

That is, as I said, until last year…

In Robyn Silver: The Midnight Chimes, released last September, Robyn’s life is transformed by the discovery that she is a Chime Child: one who through the circumstances of her birth can see monsters. And suddenly with the waking of these powers, she finds herself having to protect those around her from things they cannot see. Robyn has a choice: does she ignore this strange new world or does she become a secret hero?

Luckily for Robyn, she’s not alone. Alongside best friends and fellow Chimes Nora and Aiden, Robyn is trained by the mysterious Mr Cryptorum and (the frankly magnificent) Miss Smiting. Together they strive to keep the town safe from unseen invaders of a beastly kind.

Paula Harrison merges the fantastic with the everyday, making it tantalisingly easy for middle grade readers to let their imaginations run absolute riot. Children will be enchanted by the premise, excited by the action (there is so much here to keep kids glued to the story) and asking for more!

Robyn is far too marvellous to be contained in just one story and this July sees the plucky heroine return for another adventure:

Robyn Silver: The Darkest Dream

“Fettle cleared his throat and began reading: ‘At 12:53 on Wednesday 9th March, the Grand Master of the Clocks measured a spike in dark energy readings. This matched a similar but smaller spike last December, and after many calculations he believes that a monster of significant power is about to rise here in Wendleton.'”

Robyn’s got more experience of dealing with the vast and scary monster community this time round, and boy, is she going to need it! If Mr Fettle from the International Federation of Chimes is to be believed, something wicked is heading for the town. There are even more deliciously scary monsters to battle, but with The Federation watching every move it isn’t going to be easy.

In The Darkest Dream, we share in even more of Robyn’s world as she develops her skills as a Chime and continues to be a smart cookie and a bright and brilliant role model for readers.

Robyn Silver in Class

The Robyn Silver series are the sort of book that make children want to write as well as read, so I was delighted to find a wide range of terrific resources over on the Scholastic site to go with the Robyn Silver books. Children can use templates to draw their own wishes, make a monster compendium and complete a crossword amongst other activities. Here’s the link.

I’d also really recommend you check out Paula Harrison’s Five Writing Tips over on YouTube: link here. I love Paula’s approach and can’t wait to share it in class. It’s very accessible and Paula also shares that she uses drawing as part of the writing process: something I would love to see schools encouraging more of in lessons.

 

Thanks so much to Scholastic for sending me these fabulous books!

 


The Big, Fat, Totally Bonkers Diary of Pig

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By Emer Stamp

“Hello.

Me I is Pig. I is big and pink (sometimes a bit brown if I has been rolling in mud). My best friend Duck says I has stopped growing; that I has reached my maximum size. But I don’t think this is true. I is sure when I eats a lot I gets a bit bigger and when I don’t eat so much. I gets a little bit smaller.”

Pig is Back!

Pig is back and he’s on hilarious form in this, his fourth diary in the bestselling series by Emer Stamp. Action and adventure await young readers as Pig finds himself faced once again with those most dastardly of book villains, the Evil Chickens. Stitched up by the atrocious avians and forced to leave the farm, Pig’s life takes a Big, Fat, Totally Bonkers turn that kids will thoroughly enjoy. Old friends and new join in with the fun, farts and frolics as Pig faces danger (and chickens) in order to save the day.

A Poster from Pig’s Website!

A Book With Style

With cracking characters, surprising plot turns and fab illustrations, The Big, Fat, Totally Bonkers Diary of Pig is certainly a book with style. Open it up and you’ll see something different with each turn of the page. Fonts are easy to access and change for each character, which makes for exciting reading. Emer Stamp understands what kids want from a funny book and delivers it impeccably; every teacher looking to inspire reading for pleasure should have a set of her books in their classroom. Also, do check out Emer Stamp’s Pig website- it is ABSOLUTELY BRILLIANT: there are so many great resources and things to explore. Here it is.

Children across the middle grade age range will love Pig not only for his adventures, but also for his impressive variety of farts which are described in gratifyingly specific detail. I just hope somewhere out there there’s a primary school teacher who’s prepared to take the leap and make this a class reader alongside the science topic ‘The Digestive System’. That would be just too wonderful.

GIVEAWAY!

The Big, Fat, Totally Bonkers Diary of Pig is an absolute corker of a book and you can win not just this little beauty but the whole series by following the blog tour on Twitter and retweeting my review. Good luck!

Thanks very much to Scholastic UK for sending me this copy of The Big, Fat, Totally Bonkers Diary of Pig and for asking me to be part of the blog tour.


Gaslight by Eloise Williams

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It isn’t every book that wins the whippet seal of approval, you know.

” My mother disappeared on the sixth of September, 1894.

I was found at the docks in Cardiff, lying like a gutted fish at the water’s edge.”

And so starts an intriguing prologue that leads us into Nansi Howell’s life.

Nansi

In chapter one, we find Nansi five years older and in the dubious “care” of Sid who runs a theatre along with other less salubrious ventures. Under Sid’s control, she has learned to take on other identities as both an actor and a thief. Still, Nansi is determined to hold on to her hopes and dreams doing what she can to uncover any clues as to where her mother might be.

Then the arrival of two new theatre acts have an impact on Nansi’s life that means things will never be the same again. Readers aged nine years plus will thrill at being plunged into Eloise Williams’ tale of Victorian Cardiff. Nansi is a character to take to the heart and one who children will find a great empathy for. Gaslight is full of surprises and as good an adventure as you could possibly want and as I’ve come to expect from Firefly Press who consistently publish amazing children’s literature. And look at that cover! Isn’t it just beautiful?

Gaslight

I’ve been looking forward to reading Gaslight for a long time and now I’ve finished it the one thing that strikes me as amazing is the amount of heart and drama Eloise Williams has created in less than 200 pages.  There’s huge depth of story and as I read, I felt like Gaslight functioned as an ink and paper time machine, with surroundings as real as you would wish for. This is exactly what makes me want to share it in class: to see the response from children to not only a cracking adventure plot, but also to the wider picture of Nansi’s life. I fully anticipate mass gasping and holding of breath and hands raised with questions that just can’t wait. I’m pretty convinced Gaslight is one of those books that keeps kids glued even after the home-time bell has rung. I’m looking forward to finding out!

Gaslight: a vivid and breath-taking piece of story-telling brilliance.


Evie’s Ghost by Helen Peters

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“A high metallic strike made me jump. But it was only the living room clock. It struck twelve, and the last stroke faded away.

And as it faded away, the wind stopped whistling in the chimney. The water stopped gurgling in the pipes. The breeze stopped rustling in the trees. 

I had never known such silence. It was as though the world was holding its breath.”

Christmas Eve, the air just before it snows, getting ready to go out somewhere special. Things that hold a sense of delicious anticipation that make the main event even better. Evie’s Ghost by Helen Peters has this from the very start;  a tantalising piece of children’s historical fiction that gives me this exact same feeling. And being surrounded with such a compelling combination of anticipation and action, it’s wonderfully easy to get caught up.

We join Evie as she goes to stay with godmother Anna while her mum’s on honeymoon. Thrown into the unknown setting of Anna’s flat in an old converted manor house, Evie begins to pick up on the history around her and learns about the tragic Sophia Fane: a previous inhabitant who left an intriguing inscription on the window of Evie’s room.

Later that night as the clock strikes twelve, Evie finds herself invited into the past- specifically to 1814 and Sophia’s time. She has a role to play in Sophia’s fate, but even in the past time marches forward. Will Evie manage to help Sophia and still get back to her own time or will she remain trapped in the past?

Evie’s Ghost is a beauty of a book that will have young readers and listeners on the edge of their seats asking for the next chapter. Teachers looking for a riveting class reader will appreciate this and will love the way Helen Peters creates drama and empathy, especially around Evie’s perceptions of the past and the people she meets. There are differences to consider throughout and the author strikes a sensitive balance between noting advantages of the modern world and suggesting sacrifices made for it.

There is enormous value beyond the pages of Evie’s Ghost, especially for Upper Key Stage Two classes looking to study the past in a really meaningful way. Use it to create great drama opportunities in relation to the story, then take it further and encourage children to find their own inner Evie to explore their own slice of local history outside of the classroom and away from the internet.

Evie’s Ghost: perceptive, inspiring, absorbing, and a must for fans of historical fiction.

 


Who Let the Gods Out by Maz Evans

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Book seen here with terrifying Easter Bunny

“It began on a Friday, as strange things often do.”

Who Let the Gods Out

Elliot’s worries are very much grounded in the real world. His mum isn’t well and whilst Elliot is trying to hold everything together, the money problems keep coming. If he doesn’t find £20,000 in exactly one week they will be turfed out of their farm for good with nowhere to go.

But sometimes life surprises you with a bolt from the blue.

(Or a constellation.)

Possibly the last thing Elliot was expecting to land in their cowshed was Virgo: a young immortal from Elysium, on Earth to deliver ambrosia to a prisoner kept by the Gods near his home. Specifically, under Stonehenge. Thrown together by fate, they join forces but when the delivery goes wrong and the pair accidentally release Thanatos, diabolical Daemon of Death, things get a bit dicey. With the whole of the human race under threat, it’s time to get the big guns involved. Enter Zeus and a cast of Gods like you’ve never seen them before.

MG Roller Coaster

Who Let the Gods is a substantial MG roller coaster of an adventure.  It’s a big story- over 350 pages- and is packed full of action and humour. It’s properly roll around on the floor can’t get your breath funny. The characters are varied and hilarious. For example:

Charon the ferryman crossing passengers over the river Styx is genius, a kind of London cabbie:

“Right-o, we’ll take the Severn- the Wye’s murder this time of day.”

And Zeus, retired for the past 2000 years. An ageing Lothario, schmoozing mortal women and having a blast:

“…he was rather surprised to find Zeus in a badly fitting light-blue tuxedo with a frilly shirt, holding a cheese and ham vol-au-vent. The long white hair was there, albeit badly slicked back with hair gel. And it wasn’t a strapping chest bursting out so much as a gigantic belly.”

Then there’s Sisyphus, who I’m pleased to report has a lisp. Thithyphuth.

I’ll leave you to discover the episode with Her Maj the Queen; sufficed to say it’s rather surprising!

Reader Response

Whether it’s a main character or a brief encounter, the attention given to reader response is second to none. This is why I’d love to teach it and see those reactions first hand. If I were sharing this with a class, I’d have a whale of a time. I’d be going all out with drama, role play, anything to get the children up and enjoying the pure joy Who Let the Gods Out gives. Fun and learning, together at last!

Who Let the Gods Out is the first part of a series and I’m very much looking forward to the next book, out in the summer.

 

 

 

 

 


The Secret of Nightingale Wood by Lucy Strange

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” I stared into the dark mass of trees ahead, and my imagination ambushed me with nightmarish creatures- slavering wolves, whispering tree-demons, long-fingered witches… Every part of me was alive with fear now- my fingers, my skin, my lungs…

And then a sudden, desperate shriek pierced the night like a needle.

I froze. An owl? But it sounded almost human…

I turned back to look at the house- and stifled a scream.”

Hope House

It’s 1919 and twelve year old Henrietta Abbott (Henry) and her family have just moved to Hope House. Her brother Robert’s recent death has caused deep grief for all that knew him and through Henry we see the repercussions. Mama becomes ill, Father leaves indefinitely to work abroad but Henry remains with baby sister ‘Piglet’ in the care of Nanny Jane and Mrs Berry the cook. Mama’s getting no better and Henry has a bad feeling about Doctor Hardy, who seems to have a plan all of his own in regards to her remaining family…

Nightingale Wood

As she watches and listens, Henry begins to unveil the secrets of Nightingale Wood and Hope House- but sometimes your mind can play tricks on you. Is she seeing shadows of the past or things as they really are? Prepare for a storytelling masterpiece. The quote I’ve included above illustrates this perfectly: for writing to take you into the woods at night then reveal that the home you’ve come from is the source of the fear you’ve been expecting is a brilliant way of playing with narration. As for Henry, she’s a delight. A strong spirit with the ability to learn from her own  misconceptions. A heroic soul.

Everything you’ve heard about The Secret of Nightingale Wood is true: it’s completely as wonderful as they say it is. Suitable for readers aged nine years plus but I’d recommend it equally to adults as children, I have to say. I enjoyed the intertextuality throughout the story, and the relationship Lucy Strange creates between The Secret of Nightingale Wood and children’s books that Henry would have enjoyed at the time. Young independent readers will have the extra pleasure of being able to explore Henry’s favourite writers as she mentions them in the text. I think this is just wonderful- what a way to continue getting to know a character!

Utterly Gorgeous!

This is historical fiction with a pinch of psychological thriller, enticing and captivating. I was torn between greedily rushing to discover the outcome and taking my time over some of the most gorgeous prose I’ve read in ever such a long time. It was a good problem to have! The Secret of Nightingale Wood is an utterly gorgeous book.


Me and Mister P

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Written by Maria Farrer and Illustrated by Daniel Rieley

“The bear stood like a statue. Inside Arthur’s very still body, his heart was thumping and inside his very still head his mind was racing. He thought it best to seem friendly so he nodded and smiled at the polar bear. The bear nodded at Arthur and bared its long, sharp teeth.”

Mister P

Arthur cannot see past his brother Liam. Whether he’s blocking Arthur’s view of the football on the television by sitting far too close to the screen or embarrassing him in front of his friends, Liam seems to be blocking Arthur from enjoying a normal life. Liam’s challenging behaviour is becoming too much for his brother to deal with and he decides he’s had enough. He leaves the house. On the doorstep as he goes to leave, is a polar bear. This is Mister P and he’s come to stay.

There’s a fine tradition of marvellous bears in children’s literature and Mister P is a more than welcome addition. He is gorgeous and funny and you will love him. A giant white bear, a little on the quiet side, very skilled at blinking and dancing, with an alarmingly toothy grin. No one knows why he’s come to stay or how long he’s planning to stay for, but Arthur wholeheartedly takes on care of him.

The Good Stuff…

In turn, Mister P helps Arthur to understand that although life may not always be fair, it’s not always unfair either. Arthur begins to notice more of the good stuff whilst it’s happening and finds out what really matters to him. As well as entertaining us with lots of fun, there are also the most wonderfully touching moments in Me and Mister P.

And Chocolate Ice Cream Too.

This would be a lovely class reader for any Junior classroom. I’d be equally happy to share it in Year Six as I would in Year Three; a good book is a good book after all and this is a story that provides real depth of content and thought-provoking discussion points. Autism is never directly mentioned in Me and Mister P, but it’s fair to presume that Liam is autistic from his behaviour patterns. I like that he isn’t labelled in the book and I think you’ll enjoy how he changes throughout the story.

The most interesting children’s books (I think) are the ones that can be accessed equally on different levels and the most interesting polar bears are the ones who like eating chocolate ice cream. Luckily, Me and Mister P provides both of these key features. Beautifully illustrated, beautifully written.

Me and Mister P: what a heart warming read for this cold January day.

 

 

Big thanks to Oxford University Press for sending me this lovely book.


Strange Star by Emma Carroll

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strange-star

Strange Star

It’s a gloomy old Saturday here in the West Mids and I’m wishing I was still reading Strange Star by Emma Carroll. If you haven’t already, I’d get yourselves a copy forthwith and settle in for some deliciously extraordinary happenings.

Lake Geneva, June 1816

At The Vila Diodati, Lord Byron is planning an evening of ghost stories with friends. His servant Felix has been sent to deliver the invitations to Mr and Mrs Shelley and Miss Clairmont who are staying nearby. The weather is unseasonable for June to say the least and the servants are discussing it:

” ‘It’s the comet causing all this queer weather,’ Frau Moritz said over her shoulder. ‘Comets are a bad omen. Always have been, always will be.’

Yet that didn’t explain why it was still cold, still stormy, even when the comet had nearly disappeared. “

A strange star indeed.

Lizzie Appleby

As preparations are made for the evening, a storm rolls over Lake Geneva, bringing early darkness. The stories begin but are interrupted by an apparent sighting of someone at the window and then by a loud knock at the door. The anticipation of ‘something’ is brilliant; the best I’ve read since my first encounter with The Turn of the Screw. Then it gets even more intriguing.

Felix opens the door to find a young girl, covered in scars and apparently dead. After trying to resuscitate her, the party abandons hope and drifts away- that is except for Felix and Mary Shelley who refuse to give up thankfully. The girl is Lizzie Appleby and she has an urgent story to tell: one that will both captivate you and chill you to the bone…

Honestly, I could just go on and on about Strange Star; I’ve already hit my ‘recommended word count’ for a blog post and don’t feel like I’ve even begun to do it justice.

So, What Do You Need to Know?

I can’t put you through several thousand words though, so what do you need to know?

Well, that it’s entirely suitable for children aged 10 years plus but still managed to spook me very satisfactorily. It’s also a masterclass in how to bring a scene to life: there’s this bit on a hillside in a snowstorm and another in a tunnel later on and I’m telling you, you will be so present you’ll feel the sting of the snow and taste the mustiness of the damp earth around you. You also need to know that it’s heavily bound up with Mary Shelley, Frankenstein and enough real-life elements to make you question what really happened and who really existed. And it’s oh so very good at it. Strange Star will also encourage further reading and further exploration of literature, of that I’m sure.

Great for fans of historical fiction and absolutely one of my favourite reads this year. More of this please.

 

 


The Girl Who Saved Christmas by Matt Haig

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Illustrations by Chris Mould

girl-saved-christmas-done

” Do you know how magic works?

The kind of magic that gets reindeer to fly in the sky? The kind that helps Father Christmas travel around the world in a single night? The kind that can stop time and make dreams come true?

Hope.

That’s how. 

Without hope, there would be no magic.”

The Girl Who Saved Christmas

I’ve been waiting for this for, ooh, ages. Having absolutely loved Matt Haig’s A Boy Called Christmas last year (my review here), this book has been much-anticipated at Books-a-Go-Go. There’s always a bit of a risk building something up, but I wasn’t worried. This is, after all, Matt Haig and Chris Mould, so nothing less than gorgeousness was expected. I wasn’t disappointed.

Christmas Eve

Victorian London, a city of contrasts. At the gloomy end of things (and about as far from Queen Victoria as you can get) is our Amelia: a girl with hope in her heart but troubles on her doorstep. Her mother is very ill and they’re struggling to get by on Amelia’s wage as a chimney sweep. Then there’s the dastardly Mr Creeper waiting in the wings to send Amelia to his workhouse should the worst happen. Shudder. But Amelia believes in goodness and wishes coming true; she believes in Father Christmas.

Miles and miles away, up in Elfhelm, something is badly wrong. What began as a faint tremor develops into a catastrophe that not even the elves can fix. Everything hangs in the balance. Christmas is under threat and the magic created by children’s hope begins to fade…

Father Christmas is going to need help this time, but is it too late to rescue both Christmas and Amelia? Set over two Christmases, this is a festive feast with a big soul and a oodles of adventure. Kids aged nine years plus will love it: Matt Haig has a narrative style children will trust to take them on a wonderful journey. He’s clearly on the side of his young readers and kids expect that kind of thing but don’t always get it. For children to become hooked on fiction, they need a need to hear more of this kind of voice. It also helps if the story is great too, which this is.

Chris Mould’s fabulous illustrations bring everything to life. They are happily plentiful and bring more Christmas joy than you could shake a candy cane at. Remind me again why all books aren’t illustrated? It really does seem a shame that they aren’t, doesn’t it? Especially when they add so much.

The Girl Who Saved Christmas is, as expected, a gorgeous book with some lovely surprising touches. I’m planning to reread both together before the big day. The Girl Who Saved Christmas will hopefully be adding a little more magic to your Christmas too!

 

Huge spangly thanks to Canongate for sending me this lovely book.