I Can Only Draw Worms by Will Mabbitt

Posted on

Pure genius, right here people!

I Can Only Draw Worms

I Can Only Draw Worms, suitable for children aged three years and over, is very cool indeed. It’s a picture book, a counting book and a very funny adventure about ten worms. As the narrator confesses, he can only draw worms- so we are told this is what the book is about. A brilliant idea which translates into a book that will have the grown ups laughing just as much as the kids.

Never Mind the Molluscs…

With an eye mugging colour combination of yellow and pink- more usually associated with a certain well-known punk album- I Can Only Draw Worms demands attention and wholly deserves it.¬†Will Mabbitt manages to give counting to ten an anarchic wit rarely seen and much appreciated here. I’m loving the chaotic colouring of the worms themselves and the somewhat unexpected personalities attributed to them. I’m looking at you Worm Four.

…Invertebrates are Truly Great!

See the worms engage in adventure and risk mild peril along the way. I Can Only Draw Worms is not just a lovely book but also very good value: it provides a great way of getting kids enjoying counting with the Brucie Bonus of also beginning to see the wonder of reading for pleasure. And what could possibly be better than that?

I Can Only Draw Worms: as outre a picture book about worms as I have ever read; a triumph and a joy and you’ll love it.

 


Triangle by Mac Barnett & Jon Klassen

Posted on

“One day Triangle walked out of his door and away from his house.

He was going to play a sneaky trick on Square.”

Triangle

Suitable for children aged three years plus, Triangle is a charming new picture book from award-winning duo Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen. This is sneaky trick-based fun without parallel.

The story is about Triangle, who walks to Square’s house in order to play a trick. He does this and Square retaliates by following him home and depending on your point of view, either returning the favour with a trick of his own or getting into a scrape that inadvertently has the effect of a well placed trick.

It’s a gorgeous book to pick up and handle. It has thick board covers, it’s chunky. It’s a shape! It’s even more 3D than a normal book. (Well, it isn’t, but it feels it.)

The narrative is really well paced and reminded me of the Mr Men, my favourite books when I was little. It’s not brightly coloured and nor does it need to be; there are a range of muted colours and brush marks in the palette that are beautiful to look at. Take it outside into the sunlight and you’ll see what I mean. The backgrounds are more than a bit Rothko and we see Triangle making his way past boulder like structures which impact us in different ways depending on their size and shade. They are important enough for the narrator to draw the reader’s attention to their shapes which change as the journey progresses.

Square

What’s really impressive is how much character and personality is transmitted from two shapes with eyes and legs and nothing else. Look here at poor Square, mid-trick and very nervous:

Later in the book we see him fed up, angry, determined and slightly disconcerted and it all works perfectly. These drawings are anything but simple; every emotion gets across its message and works hard with the text to do it in a way that appears effortless. At the same time, kids will see accessible imagery and characters that say “Draw us! Send us on one of your own adventures!”.

Triangle wont be everyone’s cup of tea, but it should be. Does everything a good picture book should do and more.

PS- Upside down, Triangle looks a bit like Norman:

 

 

 

 


Superbat by Matt Carr

Posted on

 

“Is it a BIRD?

Is it a PLANE?

Er… I think it’s a BAT in a funny little costume!”

Superbat

Pat the bat is having trouble sleeping. Bored of being a normal bat, he wants to be more like the superheroes in his comics. Pat is the kind of bat who has an idea and acts upon it. He gets things done, has a cup of tea and then he does a bit more.

The other bats question that his super powers aren’t actually all that super, being as all bats have them. Although his ears flop a little with sadness, Pat picks himself up, takes his skills and uses them for good! Check out his antics for yourself, enjoy his story and learn more about bats along the way.

A Book with Style

Hands down the most super bat I have encountered in children’s literature with the most super art work; this is a book with style. Some proper colour genius is going on here: we have teal and red and mustard and together they are magnificent. A book that provides not only excellent design but also offers new colourway combinations for the wardrobe as we sashay into spring. What could possibly be better?

Just this: the best aspect of Superbat for me is the message it sends out to young readers that we can all do extraordinary things. What seems ordinary to a bat is extraordinary to us and what we take as normal can provide us with the means to do achieve wonderful outcomes. We can all be amazing with or without the cape. Preferably with though.

We could learn a lot from Pat the Bat. We too can be heroes.

Superbat is full-on, important, technicolour joy.

 

Thanks Scholastic for sending me this lovely book!