The Robyn Silver Series by Paula Harrison

Posted on

This Friday I’m lucky enough to have Paula Harrison stopping by with an exclusive guest post for fans of the Robyn Silver series. For those of you who don’t know the books already, I’ve reviewed them below and added some really brilliant links to resources to use in class. Enjoy!

Robyn Silver: The Midnight Chimes

Until last year, Robyn Silver was an ordinary ten year old girl living in an ordinary town doing ordinary everyday things. The middle child of five, Robyn was used to being a little overlooked and the greatest danger in her life was missing out on the last slice of pizza at the dinner table.

That is, as I said, until last year…

In Robyn Silver: The Midnight Chimes, released last September, Robyn’s life is transformed by the discovery that she is a Chime Child: one who through the circumstances of her birth can see monsters. And suddenly with the waking of these powers, she finds herself having to protect those around her from things they cannot see. Robyn has a choice: does she ignore this strange new world or does she become a secret hero?

Luckily for Robyn, she’s not alone. Alongside best friends and fellow Chimes Nora and Aiden, Robyn is trained by the mysterious Mr Cryptorum and (the frankly magnificent) Miss Smiting. Together they strive to keep the town safe from unseen invaders of a beastly kind.

Paula Harrison merges the fantastic with the everyday, making it tantalisingly easy for middle grade readers to let their imaginations run absolute riot. Children will be enchanted by the premise, excited by the action (there is so much here to keep kids glued to the story) and asking for more!

Robyn is far too marvellous to be contained in just one story and this July sees the plucky heroine return for another adventure:

Robyn Silver: The Darkest Dream

“Fettle cleared his throat and began reading: ‘At 12:53 on Wednesday 9th March, the Grand Master of the Clocks measured a spike in dark energy readings. This matched a similar but smaller spike last December, and after many calculations he believes that a monster of significant power is about to rise here in Wendleton.'”

Robyn’s got more experience of dealing with the vast and scary monster community this time round, and boy, is she going to need it! If Mr Fettle from the International Federation of Chimes is to be believed, something wicked is heading for the town. There are even more deliciously scary monsters to battle, but with The Federation watching every move it isn’t going to be easy.

In The Darkest Dream, we share in even more of Robyn’s world as she develops her skills as a Chime and continues to be a smart cookie and a bright and brilliant role model for readers.

Robyn Silver in Class

The Robyn Silver series are the sort of book that make children want to write as well as read, so I was delighted to find a wide range of terrific resources over on the Scholastic site to go with the Robyn Silver books. Children can use templates to draw their own wishes, make a monster compendium and complete a crossword amongst other activities. Here’s the link.

I’d also really recommend you check out Paula Harrison’s Five Writing Tips over on YouTube: link here. I love Paula’s approach and can’t wait to share it in class. It’s very accessible and Paula also shares that she uses drawing as part of the writing process: something I would love to see schools encouraging more of in lessons.

 

Thanks so much to Scholastic for sending me these fabulous books!

 


Stories & Art Should be Connected- So Why Isn’t it Happening?

Posted on

1979

1979: top year at Stivichall Infant School, Coventry, one afternoon. My teacher asks me to do a painting of the unflinching Mrs Blue-Hat of  Shelia McCullagh’s book series One, Two, Three and Away. She’s proved too much for one of my class mates and a replacement is needed for display. Despite having my eye on Jennifer Yellow-Hat, I’m more than happy to do this. I love art and this is my chance to show I’m good at it. I complete a big, bold vision in blacks and blues on buff sugar paper. My teacher likes it and it makes the display.

Connecting Art and Stories

I so clearly remember that afternoon and what my picture looked like. Using our reading books as our inspiration was something we often did at primary school. We read and we listened to stories; we thought about them and together we talked about them. We painted and drew freely, visualising them within an A3 framework.

When I was about  nine or ten, we read The Hobbit. We were halfway through the book and the teacher asked us all to paint a scene we’d enjoyed. Mine (I recall) was of Bilbo Baggins being dangled upside-down and poked in the belly by one of the soon to be turned to stone trolls. In the background I added poster paint glints of a rising sun. Nearby were the other two trolls arguing. I’m not entirely sure it was a very accomplished piece (in fact, I’m almost entirely sure my Bilbo Baggins was for some reason a real dead ringer for Captain Caveman) but I do remember spending that whole lovely long lesson caught up in the magic of the story and trying my best to re-imagine every last detail. We loved our class readers and wanted to spend time with them and we were given the space in which to do this.

A Common Bond

Years later, I trained and worked as a secondary art teacher before I became a primary practitioner. I transferred down with anticipation of creativity without bounds and space for stories and pictures. I was told straight off that I needed to find another main subject because I wouldn’t get anywhere with art. Opportunities were few and far between for educators and pupils, I was to discover.

Although big budget projects were something most children got to experience at some point (and that was brilliant), the bread and butter of art- the drawing and painting I’d grown up with – was becoming a more and more elusive part of the curriculum. Class teachers were often not part of it at all. The bond of a teacher sharing a book with their class and being able to enrich it with art wasn’t just vanishing though, it was being swept under the carpet. It became, and still is seen as a waste of learning time with no measurable benefit.

The Primary Curriculum

A lot of us have direct experience of this. I was pulled up in a literacy lesson observation for allowing my Year Fives to illustrate their written work. I was told it wasn’t writing and had nothing to do with it. That the children would rush their writing in order to do the art. I disagreed: by illustrating, they could explore the text through use of a different language. The children had enjoyed their writing and now could explore ideas,become more proficient and enjoy contributing to a great cultural history of words and art in collaboration. They were engaged in their reflection of the written work and contributing creatively to the school environment. And yep, the bold type relates to our current national curriculum.

Means and Minds

I wished I’d said this. In reality I just nodded a lot and didn’t illustrate another extended write. Looking back though, what was implied was that children don’t like writing and that art is an excuse to not do it. This is not just a shame, but also a self-fulfilling prophecy. Children pick up on this stuff.

The primary curriculum offers many possibilities if we let it. Observe, review and revisit can easily be used in relation to enriching our class readers. With The Hobbit all those years ago as one tiny example, we were observing: observing our own relationship with the story. We were reviewing the scenes we’d listened to and choosing our own to depict. By revisiting the story and applying and expanding our own knowledge and abilities, we owned a world of imagination. We have curriculum guidelines now, but they are open to interpretation and can allow us to adapt them to our own children’s needs. We have the means and the minds to justify what we do.

A Thousand Genius Lesson Ideas

Last week I asked my Year Six class how they would want to respond to a book if they could choose a way. Overwhelmingly, they wanted to draw. They wanted to do art about their books in wonderful and imaginative ways. They wanted to picture their favourite book character at different points in their lives: imagine a teenage Dumbledore or Matilda as an old lady. How cool is that? They just wanted to draw with thought and then see it on the wall afterwards. They had a thousand genius lessons at their fingertips that they’d always wanted to experience.

Children haven’t changed. They want to be read to and they want to draw about it. Regularly. Not in ‘Golden Time’. Not during wet break. With value and worth attached. As teachers and leaders, we ‘re working so hard to encourage reading for pleasure, to move away from reading as an assessed task or even worse a punishment. With art, and in particular drawing and painting, we need to do a really different job: step back from art as a treat or reward and lose the given ‘hobby’ tag. Bring art and literature back together and let them meet in the middle.

Making Art and Stories Happen

As an enthusiastic amateur artist and long-time promoter of reading for pleasure, I’m going to be doing my best to champion this and encourage more art back into the primary classroom in connection with the brilliant books you’re all reading to your classes. Nothing expensive or hard to resource, but relevant though, and hopefully also  enjoyable, valuable, reflective, individual, inspiring and memorable. I’ll be looking at the amazing children’s books I’ve reviewed and giving you art plans you can bring to your teaching. Please let me know of any books you’d like me to focus on as a priority and I’d be more than happy to do that. Let’s reconnect art and stories in the primary classroom.


The Unicorns of Blossom Wood by Catherine Coe

Posted on

Best Friends & Storms and Rainbows

unicorns-3-4-done

Previously in The Unicorns of Blossom Wood…

Having reviewed The first two Unicorns of Blossom Wood books last year and been delighted with the response they received from my class, I’m really pleased to see two new titles have been added to the collection. I’ve found children to adore these illustrated stories, and I’m happy to say both boys and girls and of all primary ages. I teach in Year Six and the first two books were a big success with my class- more on this later.

As with Books One and Two, Catherine Coe continues to tell the story of three cousins holidaying together. It’s rare for Cora, Lei and Isabelle to spend time as a family as they are from different parts of the world.

To recap the story so far: the adventures really start when one day the cousins find some hoof prints in a cove near their campsite. When they step into them, they are instantly transported to a magical land called Blossom Wood where they transform into unicorns.

You can read my reviews of the first two books here to find out more about these adventures.

Storms and Rainbows

In Book Three, the girls are all feeling a bit frustrated. It’s been a whole week since their last Blossom Wood visit and also Lei’s upset because unlike her cousins she doesn’t know what her unicorn magic is yet. She decides to take matters into her own hands and visit Blossom Wood alone to try to find out, but it seems her magic is even more powerful than she ever imagined…

It’s soon up to Lei and the other girls to save the Blossom Wood animals from imminent disaster!

Best Friends

All good things must come to an end and sadly it’s the last night of the holiday. Just as the girls think they may never visit Blossom Wood again, an opportunity arises and they get their final chance to return! Once there, they’re excited to find that Loulou the squirrel (fabulous name for a squirrel isn’t it?) is organising a talent show. Lei, Cora and Isabelle are the first to help her sort out everything and even plan a sleepover in the magical wood. But not all is well and the cousins discover something is making Loulou really sad. Can their unicorn magic save the day one more time?

As with the rest of the series there are always a variety of quizzes and activities at the back of the book, plus introductions to other books.

Special Powers

Best Friends and Storms & Rainbows are full of fun and adventure, magic and warmth. They bring a smile to my face, as all of the books have. I can’t begin to tell you how much of a success the series has been in my classroom. Most of the children have read them and many have had them back to re-read. I’ve had pupils spending free time reading them in preference to playing games with their friends. They’ve been inspired to draw pictures of the characters both at home and at school. This unicorn magic is clearly rubbing off!

I’ve been so chuffed with how much the children have loved the books and in particular two girls who were previously thought of as reluctant readers. The Unicorns of Blossom Wood helped them to discover the kind of books they enjoy; before they read them they were very unsure and struggled to settle with a text at all. Today I worked with those girls and was pleased to see that they were both reading stories of a similar genre and very happily involved in them. I know they’ll be delighted when I take these two new titles in tomorrow.

The Unicorns of Blossom Wood magically turn children into readers- now that’s what I call a special power!

 

Thanks to Scholastic for sending me these copies.

 


Re-reading for Pleasure and Purpose

Posted on

repeated reading

“My child only ever reads *insert book or series here*. How can I get them to read something different?”

Any primary teacher will tell you that there are some questions regarding children’s attitudes to reading that never seem to go away. One that I’ve spent a lot of time considering is the issue adults- both parents and teachers- have when a child is repeat reading the same book or series of books. The concern is that the child treads water academically, consequently restricting their breadth of experience. More often than not I’ve found the questioning adult already has a solution: to interest the child in a new book of a similar theme. The hope is that I, as the teacher, can suggest the right one.

The Answer Is You Shouldn’t…

I’ve found this to be something of a poisoned chalice. Introducing children to their next favourite book or finding something to excite a reluctant reader is a wonderful thing, but what about when the child has already found that perfect match? That’s not something I would ever want to dismiss. Sometimes, the only book a child wants to read is the one they’ve just finished.

I get this; I read like this as a child and to some extent if my ‘to read’ pile runs low, I will happily revert to type. When I was eight I would greedily borrow Marianne Dreams by Catherine Storr from the mobile library every week. Likewise, the Alice in Wonderland audio book from Earlsdon Library. At home, even though I’d inherited a stack of varied Enid Blytons from my brothers, I was only ever really interested in the boarding school books. The Famous Five never got a look in. I would read my way through Darryl Rivers’ school career up to the point where she is leaving for university and feel so sad that it was all over that I would immediately return to the very first term again.

I didn’t see a problem with repeated reading back then, and to be honest I still don’t. What we read is our personal choice. Once we question someone else’s personal choice, no matter how solid we may think our intentions are, we interrupt a crucial process.

Margaret Meek considers how children read in the brilliant How Texts Teach What Readers Learn.  This was written in 1987 and is so good that Meek’s thoughts are certainly still pertinent today. I’d recommend school leaders take a couple of hours to read through this short but mighty book for insight and inspiration. When considering the issue of repeated reading, Meek makes the excellent point that maybe we, the adults, are actually less not more skilled than children in making reading decisions. That more often than not, we are the ones who read only what we’re comfortable with and never happily take risks.

To illustrate this point, I was reminded of a conversation recently had with an ex-colleague who loves reading. She explained her favourite genre: she reads books where the plots were set in American High Schools, based around sports- ideally hockey- and involving a friends to lovers story line which is written in the first person. Pretty specific, and that’s fair enough, because as an adult she has the benefit of complete and utter control over the contents of her own kindle. Be honest, most of us do this to some extent: we stick to type.

Children, on the other hand, are constantly being introduced to new genres. More than that, they are expected to read, absorb, comprehend and even emulate texts in style, week in week out as part of their ongoing learning. Maybe they’re the adventurous ones. Maybe adults should question whether they are really the right ones to be making all the decisions about children’s independent reading habits.

What are the benefits of repeated reading? Simply this: children need to read the same thing again and again.

Truly no one reads the same book twice.

The first read might tell a child what happens, but it’s by reading for the second, third, tenth time where true discovery can take place. The practice of reading becomes easier, new words are understood and noted, sub-text is revealed too. Multiple meanings may even emerge. The child begins to get into the author’s head, to really comprehend fully the whole spirit of the book. In short, they are undertaking the sort of immersion teachers dream of, but doing it all on their own and quite naturally from an early age.

Literacy leaders won’t need me to point out how this could impact across the board when assessing reading, including the holy grail of developing inference. This is something that can be gained by reading picture books right through to Middle Grade titles. We mustn’t make the mistake of underestimating the power of something as seemingly simple as Rosie’s Walk or The Tiger Who Came to Tea.

For me it’s all about celebrating independence and trusting a child to make their own decisions. For schools running reading schemes, it shows clear progression from a mind-set that reading is about completing all the levels to one where reading is about pleasure. Now that’s something worth having a conversation about. Have that conversation. Ask the children what they love about the books they go back to time and time again. You never know, you might learn something.


The Bad Guys by Aaron Blabey

Posted on

bad guys done

” Good deeds.

Whether you like it or not.”

We Can be Heroes

The Bad Guys by Aaron Blabey, suitable for children of seven years plus, is just the thing to get your reluctant readers reading. Cool, cheeky and packed full of funny, the antics of Misters Wolf, Shark, Piranha and Snake will particularly appeal to kids who need a bit of help in finding reading fun.

Everyone knows you don’t mess with these animals; they’re the bad guys, more likely to gobble you up than lend a helping hand… until now. With Mr Wolf’s encouragement, they set about to change their reputations, to be heroes doing good deeds with hilarious results. Prepare yourselves for fast cars, fart jokes and Mr Shark dressed in a frock as the bad guys learn how to be good.

Shelf Awareness

There’s plenty going on here to keep even the most easily distracted reader entertained: varied written content combined with big, bold illustrations give a comic book feel, and a variety of size and style in fonts keeps things fresh. Then there’s the four main characters who will have even the grumpiest grown up chuckling (especially Mr Piranha, who I loved).

The Bad Guys would be a fabulous addition to any classroom or children’s library. It’s a book that’ll work hard for its shelf space, although I suspect it won’t stay on the shelf for long. With more episodes to follow, it’s likely this series will become a favourite with both the kids they’re aimed at and the adults who are keen to promote reading for pleasure. This makes it pretty heroic, in my opinion.

Kick-Starting Reading for Pleasure

Kids are great and in my experience they will try an awful lot of books before they give up on being readers. We have a long window of opportunity in primary school in which to provide books that will children will enjoy and once they find them, they even help us out by sharing them with their friends. All that the school needs to do is give its pupils the right books and the time to allow this process to happen.

From my point of view, it’s important to understand that unlocking the reader within doesn’t mean that every child should become voracious bookworms, but rather that they are armed with the knowledge of genre preference and feel confident in choosing books for themselves. These kids might not read constantly, but they will see reading as a something enjoyable they could choose to do, and honestly, we need books like The Bad Guys to kick-start this process and spread the joy.

 

Big thanks to Scholastic for sending me this copy of The Bad Guys by Aaron Blabey.


Reading for Pleasure: 11 Point Plan to Get Kids Reading!

Posted on

My 11 Point Plan To Get Kids Reading for Pleasure Has Landed…

Reading for pleasure is everything. Let’s spread the word and share the joy!

1. Remove Boundaries

First stop, talk to the kids- what kind of reading do they enjoy? Find out, listen, use or adapt this questionnaire from the National Literacy Trust and give it to your class. What does it tell you? Every class is different of course. Encourage all kinds of reading- comics, instruction manuals, whatever floats your boat. Keep a suggestions box in plain site so the children can recommend new book purchases; even better, take the children to the book shop to choose their new school books. Don’t make reading for pleasure a chore. Instead, observe the wisdom of Daniel Pennac, who wrote The Rights of The Reader and follow the instructions of his brilliant poster, illustrated by Quentin Blake. Quite the simplest and most effective explanation of creating happy readers that I’ve seen. Here’s a little version:

daniel pennac

2. Adults Get Reading

Get some reading for pleasure recommendations. There are plenty on my site, and I’d also recommend the excellent www.lovereading4kids.co.uk. Invest in the right class readers for your current cohort. Make it your business to read like billy-o. Teachers and parents need to read for pleasure too and children’s books are a source of constant delight for everyone. Find out what books parents liked when they were at school and use the information to create a lovely big display. Offer parents a space in school to develop their own book group. Provide a good example.

3. Flaunt It

Look to the reading for pleasure Experts. Go to your local library book shop and see how they present and display their books. How are they promoting them to create sales? What makes you want to borrow or buy? Look out for prominent displays, short punchy recommendations and think about how this could work in your school. Reading spaces matter. Does your book corner look exciting, welcoming and well-cared for? Does it have to be constrained to just a corner? Display all sorts of books: shiny new fiction ones, picture books, ones bursting with facts and figures, giant old mysterious books that look like they’ve been plucked from the Hogwarts restricted section. Books are beautiful for many reasons, so keep your eyes open for inspiration everywhere.

4. Tell Stories

Read to your class every day and complete at least one book a term. Run story telling clubs at lunchtime or after school. Tell parents about www.readaloud.org, a non-profit organisation that is ‘working to make reading aloud for fifteen minutes every day  a new standard in childcare’. Here’s their poster:

read aloud

Share stories with your colleagues. Make time in staff meetings to regularly share reading for pleasure gems: books, book news, sites of interest, events, competitions and soon you’ll have a whole school bank of knowledge to feed into your classrooms.

5. Make it Competitive

How many insects did James join in the giant peach? What district did Rue come from?  What gives Mr Strong his strength? Everyone loves a quiz. Get some teams together, including teachers and parents and have some fun. And make sure there are amazing bookish prizes too, of course- as well as chocolate. Remember, there must always be chocolate.

6. Promote Poetry

Entertaining, thought-provoking and creative, you should be making poetry a part of every day. Poetry is awesome. Every child can find pleasure in finishing a poem. Michael Rosen is the ultimate poet of glory. I won’t even consider visiting a school without taking my memory stick loaded with Rosen performing his poems. Pure joy. He is the absolute expert here. I recommend you check out his video tips on creating a poetry friendly classroom.

7. Inspire

Choice and motivation. Take care to recommend the right books to read for pleasure, especially for children who have just come off a prescriptive reading scheme, or those who don’t know which books to choose. Create a classroom reading box with a variety of easily accessible books that you have already read as a supportive way to encourage confidence when choosing a book. Make sure every child has a reading buddy in another year and ensure they spend time with them weekly. Cool your boots and  give children time to choose books. Tell your class about Faith, whose mum tweets  her reading habits as @272Book Faith. Faith reads a book a day and has more than 2500 twitter followers. Something of an inspiration, she donated all her finished books to her old primary school when she left too.

8. Bring Me the Funny!

Last week Scholastic revealed their new book award: The Lollies, or The Laugh Out Loud Awards to celebrate the best in funny books for children. Clever move. Funny books are unbelievably powerful: they blow a giant raspberry at the misconception that reading is silent and serious, and aim a well-placed kick up the backside of boring comprehension activities. Check out my list of funny books, or pop into your local bookshop and go for the one with the silliest cover.

9. Celebrate & Saturate

Make the most of book fairs and go to town on book weeks. Really go to town! Get authors and illustrators in, create your own sculpture trail based on favourite books, adapt a book into a film or a drama and invite people to watch, do something with your local library, ask the kids what they want to do! Celebrate reading success and books with parents- make it a part of every week. Saturate your curriculum. Source relevant books, not just for your english lessons but also for science, art, PE, everything. Get them up in the classroom, show them off, change them often. Invest in guided reading. Reading needs to be more than a bolt on, you get out what you put in. One after-school book club is nice, but for the best results you need to create a culture of reading throughout the school.

10. Be Generous

Allow the children to take the books home. All the books. If you haven’t got a library or a librarian, create your own lending system or make a note of loans but the key is to make it easy for the kids to borrow the books. What’s the worst that could happen? The books aren’t returned, right? Look at it this way: if the kids are stealing the books, you must be doing something right.

11. Keep Up To Date!

There has never been a more exciting time to read children’s books! The quality and quantity of amazing authors releasing new material is out of this world. http://booksforkeeps.co.uk/ have been independently writing about children’s books since 1980 and you should add them to your favourites. Also, twitter is a brilliant place to get the latest news and connect with authors. Plus, I’m spending as much time as possible doing this for you, so keep checking out www.booksagogo.co.uk too!

 

 

 


Reading for Pleasure: A Primary School Guide

Posted on

On Reading for Pleasure in Schools

Reading fiction is an emotional business. You don’t need to have wept your way through many Morpurgo endings to know that. With emotional response key to encouraging the reading of fiction books for pleasure, how can we get children to relate in a positive way? According to government reports, reading for pleasure increases when children have access to books, if they’re rewarded for (bribed into) reading, or see people around them doing it. True enough, but fairly general and more than a little obvious. It’s up to the schools to understand what’s going wrong- because something is going wrong and we clearly aren’t making enough of the kids in our schools want to independently read fiction. So how can we begin to change that?

What’s Up With Reading for Pleasure?

Silent reading straight after lunch is really popular in primary schools and I think one of the reasons we fail to promote a love of reading to so many of our pupils. We take children at the time of day they most want to talk to us and to each other and instead we make them sit in silence. This is tantamount to using reading as a punishment and needs to stop. Kids have so much going on at lunchtime: they might have had a really good experience that they want to talk about, or maybe they’ve had a fall out and feel awful. They come in exhilarated, emotionally engaged and ready to communicate. We see it every day and yet we suppress it. Why? Honestly, it’s usually used as an exercise to ‘calm the kids down’ before the afternoon’s lessons.

“Oh, I just love reading. It’s so calming.”

Said no-one ever.

It’s a really unnatural change of state and helps nobody except maybe teachers trying to organise afternoon resources or sort out playground issues that should have already been dealt with. Essentially, it’s a holding task. I’ve seldom seen individual reading for pleasure work in primary school and I will continue not to whilst we treat it this way. It feels like the last vestiges of the Victorian Education System hanging on for dear life and has no place in schools, especially not straight after lunch, and we should scrap it. There, I’ve said it.

A Way Out

Instead, spend more time with a class reader. Complete at least three a year and if your knowledge begins and ends with Roald Dahl,  well hey, that’s a good start and beyond that you can ask for a recommendation- I’ve got a few suggestions at the bottom of the page. Many schools like their teachers to choose class readers that fit their particular area of the creative curriculum. That’s a nice idea but it doesn’t always work. Sometimes you just need to read a book because it’s a great book, not because you’re studying the Victorians and it name checks Dr Barnardo.

Another solution is to prepare well thought out guided reading groups. These can be brilliant and much more pertinent and inspiring than silent reading time. Provide the children with books that are exciting, suitable, well-researched and of course pre-read by teachers. Let them take them home if they ask. Make the time after lunch a social time, a circle time, a time for talk! Include in it the opportunity for your class to talk about what they’re reading and what they think of it. With reading, we need to create a buzz, not a zzz.

Some schools will be reticent to kick out silent reading altogether, so I would encourage them instead to look at different approaches. Empowering pupils with the decision of when to read worked well for me last year. I gave my Year Fives the option of taking fifteen minutes out each afternoon to read their books. They could go to the book corner, or somewhere away from the group, and just read. Or not. It was up to them. Many chose to do this regularly, especially if they were reading something they really enjoyed. Some didn’t. There was no pressure because through my class readers and guided reading groups I made sure everyone engaged with fiction every day. It worked perfectly, no-one took advantage of it or used it as a way to avoid lessons. Kids never do when given the opportunity to own their learning do they? It was the how I managed to get individual, independent reading for pleasure to work.

My Recommended Reading for Pleasure Class Readers for Key Stage Two

I strongly advocate at least one reader a year is bought as a whole class set . This way everyone gets to experience the wonder of reading together as a group.

Year Three

The key time for engaging children in fiction. I’d suggest plenty of humour, imagination, linked activities and seizing the opportunity to introduce longer stories.

 

stick man big bum

The Stick Man With a Big Bum. Very funny story of Eric Trum and Johnny Staples. Includes lots of fun activities for children to try out in school and at home.

 

The adventures of Billy Slipper and his delightfully rude cat. A good route into longer stories.

Jumblecat by Archie Kimpton. The adventures of Billy Slipper and his delightfully rude cat. A good route into longer stories.

Year Four

The perfect time for introducing thought-provoking fiction and using reading time to travel beyond the bounds of normality.

An original and mystical tale which will enchant children.

Varjak Paw by SF Said. An original and mystical tale to enchant the whole class.

Touching, thought provoking and hilarious, plus comes to life when read out loud.

The Boy in the Dress by David Walliams. Thought-provoking and hilarious, plus comes to life when read out loud.

Year Five

Showing the power of fiction through different genres, these two books will get everyone engaged and talking.

Possibly the kindest children's book ever.

Wonder by RJ Palacio. Possibly the kindest children’s book ever.

Top hole murder mystery to enjoy puzzling out with your class!

First Class Murder by Robin Stevens. Top hole murder mystery to enjoy solving with your class!

Year Six

Bigger books with big themes, two gems that both deal with identity and diversity, plus the stories are second to none!

Morpurgo at his most brilliant and perfect for Year Six.

Listen to the Moon by Michael Morpurgo. Morpurgo at his most brilliant and perfect for Year Six.

Compulsive reading looking at life from a different point of view.

The London Eye Mystery by Siobhan Dowd. Compulsive reading, looking at life from a different point of view.